Courses

Breaking Bard

If you could ask William Shakespeare one question, what would it be? Those that teach the Bard, might ask him simply for the best way to find deep understanding and enjoyment in his works.  Whatever his answer might be, I doubt that he would say to enjoy it alone. Breaking Bard seeks to bring a…

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Center Stage

Sanford Meisner said, “acting is the reality of doing,” and I would add we can all learn more about teaching acting by doing it! The objective of this class is to share ourselves as performing artists, what works and doesn’t work for us as actors and acting teachers; to meet other teachers and directors who…

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CultureLab

Sustainability Then and Now Sustainability can be defined as ‘the process of maintaining change in a balanced fashion.’ What are the cultural practices that have always sought to maintain balance, and what practices are changing and ‘evolving’ out of the necessity to regain balance? What is sustainability in a cultural sense? Participants will have an…

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Death Comes for the Archibishop

Living the Book “In New Mexico, he always awoke a young man, not until he arose and began to shave did he realize that he was growing older. His first consciousness was a sense of the light dry wind blowing in through the windows, with the fragrance of hot sun and sage-brush and sweet clover;…

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Ethics, Justice, and Reconciliation

J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace and the Question of the “New” South Africa Published in 1999, just five short years after Apartheid’s collapse and Nelson Mandela’s ascendance to power, J.M. Coetzee’s novel Disgrace explicitly critiques the idea of the ‘new South Africa’, by, among other ways, allegorizing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), complicating the politics of…

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Here’s Looking at Euclid

Most math teachers I know get into teaching the subject for one simple reason: they love math.  How often, though, does the average math teacher get to learn and explore their inquisitive passion for the subject matter.  Between grading tests and homework assignments, meeting students for extra help, and planning lessons, who has time to…

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Into the Dark

“I know nothing with any certainty; but, the sight of the stars makes me dream.” Vincent Van Gogh It is said that a starry sky is equally interesting to a scientist, a philosopher, a priest, or a poet. While looking up at the bountiful richness revealed in a dark sky setting, each person experiences something…

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The River Why

Whether it’s the repetitive action of casting a fly rod, the feeling of being lost in the midst of nature, or a fisherman’s natural inclinations towards asking big questions, fly fishers have a reputation for a philosophical bent. In this course, participants will study and write philosophical literature through experiential learning in a fly fishing…

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Under the Cottonwoods and Big Blue Sky

We live busy lives with lots of noise—literal noise from the cities in which we live, noise from our fractured political landscape, noise from our insidious social media habits, noise from our complex emotional lives as teachers, partners, parents, human beings. It is a complex swirl of forces operating inside our heads. Sarah Stark has…

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What the Coyote and Junco Know

Connecting Personally with Ecology as a Foundation for Developing a Practice in Outdoor Education Can you describe the feeling or smell of the air when you first felt that you were at home in nature?  Have you heard stories from others about powerful nature connective experiences and wondered if you would ever feel the same…

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